We're all just doing waterfall really

11:00 - 12:00 Tech. Excellence

Summary

The biggest threat to agile is bad agile. Bad agile comes from misunderstanding. This session will look at how misunderstanding can alienate people.

Description

We can encounter bad agile in many places. Bad agile comes from misunderstanding. Misunderstanding itself can come from many sources: maybe it's a dogmatic ScrumMaster, agile coach or even team member; maybe it's from executives or customers who thing agile is a silver bullet that will fix all their problems. Regardless of where it comes from, this misunderstanding which leads to bad agile invariably results in agile getting a bad name - maybe even meaning agile gets blamed when things don't go well.

I encounter this misunderstanding almost every working day of my life when people tell me that agile/scrum means that you can change it to fit your current organisation "because that's what agile means". Often it is caused by people who have just read a book or two about agile/Scrum/XP etc or maybe worked on one team and then think they understand it well enough, sometimes to immediately become an agile coach or ScrumMaster themselves.

If agile is to survive, and even prosper, we need to address this misunderstanding that results in bad agile.

This session will take a (hopefully) humorous look at how bad practice caused by misunderstanding can lead to an approach being discredited and even shunned and disregarded

Learning Objectives

This session should provide a more focussed understanding of how to identify bad agile and an understanding of the potential impact of not challenging and addressing bad agile wherever it is encountered. Hopefully this will also be a call to action to people to actively study and enhance their own understanding so that they can better help others.

Venue:
Erzherzog Johann Saal
Speaker:
Iain McKenna