Tech. Excellence (3)

In diesem Track werden Software Engineers, Product Owner, Scrum Master und Agile Coaches ihre Praktiken, Methoden und Werkzeuge bezüglich Technical Excellence mit dem Publikum teilen.

Erzherzog Johann Saal 7th floor

15:00 - 16:00

Reaching Technical Excellence: From Software Sheep to Software Craftsmanship (EN)

Speaker: Stefan Wunder, Igor Roncevic
Language: English

Summary

40+ globally distributed teams and their path towards architectural runways, agile testing, code quality, and DevOps.

Description

Since beginning of 2014 AVL List GmbH has been transitioning from a formerly strict waterfall development environment towards Agile. After successfully introducing and adopted version of the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), named ALASKA (AVL's Lean Agile SW Development Process with Kaizen), we reached another challenge. The traditional development practices and tools turned out to be incapable of fulfilling the required speed, agility and expected quality of the new process. How to introduce state-of-the-art development practices like agile testing, software craftsmanship and DevOps to 40+ agile development teams and about 300 people located at 6 globally distributed development centers?

In 2016 we introduced Communities of Practices (CoP) for Agile Testing, Code Quality, Software Architecture and DevOps. Engaged and motivated CoP members managed to create a bottom up cultural change. Two years of focused effort resulted in improvement of the overall development process and establishment the software craftsmanship mindset.

Learning Objectives

* Establishing long living communities of practice

* Creating software craftsmanship mindset

* Initiating bottom up cultural change

* Improving overall development pipeline

* Introducing state-of-the-art methods and tools

* Boilerplating - Improving the improvement process

* Make improvements visible and transparent

Venue:
Erzherzog Johann Saal
13:00 - 14:30

Lösungsfokussiertes Coaching für agile Teams (DE)

Speaker: Veronika Kotrba, Ralph Miarka
Language: German

Summary

40+ globally distributed teams and their path towards architectural runways, agile testing, code quality, and DevOps.

Description

Since beginning of 2014 AVL List GmbH has been transitioning from a formerly strict waterfall development environment towards Agile. After successfully introducing and adopted version of the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), named ALASKA (AVL's Lean Agile SW Development Process with Kaizen), we reached another challenge. The traditional development practices and tools turned out to be incapable of fulfilling the required speed, agility and expected quality of the new process. How to introduce state-of-the-art development practices like agile testing, software craftsmanship and DevOps to 40+ agile development teams and about 300 people located at 6 globally distributed development centers?

In 2016 we introduced Communities of Practices (CoP) for Agile Testing, Code Quality, Software Architecture and DevOps. Engaged and motivated CoP members managed to create a bottom up cultural change. Two years of focused effort resulted in improvement of the overall development process and establishment the software craftsmanship mindset.

Learning Objectives

* Establishing long living communities of practice

* Creating software craftsmanship mindset

* Initiating bottom up cultural change

* Improving overall development pipeline

* Introducing state-of-the-art methods and tools

* Boilerplating - Improving the improvement process

* Make improvements visible and transparent

Venue:
Erzherzog Johann Saal
11:00 - 12:00

We're all just doing waterfall really (EN)

Speaker: Iain McKenna
Language: English

Summary

The biggest threat to agile is bad agile. Bad agile comes from misunderstanding. This session will look at how misunderstanding can alienate people.

Description

We can encounter bad agile in many places. Bad agile comes from misunderstanding. Misunderstanding itself can come from many sources: maybe it's a dogmatic ScrumMaster, agile coach or even team member; maybe it's from executives or customers who thing agile is a silver bullet that will fix all their problems. Regardless of where it comes from, this misunderstanding which leads to bad agile invariably results in agile getting a bad name - maybe even meaning agile gets blamed when things don't go well.

I encounter this misunderstanding almost every working day of my life when people tell me that agile/scrum means that you can change it to fit your current organisation "because that's what agile means". Often it is caused by people who have just read a book or two about agile/Scrum/XP etc or maybe worked on one team and then think they understand it well enough, sometimes to immediately become an agile coach or ScrumMaster themselves.

If agile is to survive, and even prosper, we need to address this misunderstanding that results in bad agile.

This session will take a (hopefully) humorous look at how bad practice caused by misunderstanding can lead to an approach being discredited and even shunned and disregarded

Learning Objectives

This session should provide a more focussed understanding of how to identify bad agile and an understanding of the potential impact of not challenging and addressing bad agile wherever it is encountered. Hopefully this will also be a call to action to people to actively study and enhance their own understanding so that they can better help others.

Venue:
Erzherzog Johann Saal
Subscribe to this RSS feed

Panel Discussion & Closing

Europasaal A

Take your chance to ask the key-note speakers, well experienced agile coaches, and people from business and industry your questions. Get their opinions, see if they align, and complete your Agile Austria experience with this enlightning moment. Happy to see you again next year.